highs0ciety:

arabbara:

R.I.P. The 2976 American people that lost their lives on 9/11 and R.I.P. the 48,644 Afghan and 1,690,903 Iraqi and 35000 Pakistani people that paid the ultimate price for a crime they did not commit

this is the only september 11th post I’m reblogging

(via daenerysknope)

npr:

The Ebola outbreak in West Africa has hurt Liberia more than any other country. And within Liberia, no town has been hit harder than the primarily Muslim farming town of Barkedu, in Lofa County in the far north. Despite a population of just 8,000, the small, dusty town accounts for a large percentage of the country’s more than 1,000 Ebola deaths to date. The virus has swept away entire families — children, women and men.

In Liberia’s Hard-Hit Lofa County, Ebola Continues To Take A Toll

Photo credit: Tommy Trenchard for NPR

(Above) In Barkedu, the rooms of those who succumbed to Ebola often remain untouched after their death.

Guinea Pigs

My husband gives blood all the time because he’s a universal donor (type O). So I’m thinking after my very succesful day of blood collection yesterday that I would try blood collection on my husband. 

I got all my materials ready, and waitied for him to come home. Lo and behold, this man is a hinderance to my education. His exact words (I was given creative license to turn it into a poetic format, for which I’m very proud):

I would not like to be poked

here or there.

I would not like to be poked

anywhere.

I do not like 

amateurs poking my vein.

I do not like them,

causing me pain.

eviscerator:

This device uses infrared technology to help find veins

How? Well it works in a similar way to pulse oximetry. Haemoglobin in the blood absorbs infrared light. When AccuVein’s device is held above the skin, it can detect the difference in the haemoglobin concentration between the veins and surrounding tissue, projecting a map of the veins on the skin above them. Locating the point of needle placement is suddenly simplified for phlebotomy techniques.

This technique has been used for some time when drawing blood from newborns, but is now becoming more frequently used in adults. Those with particularly difficult venous access (DVA) can include:

  • The elderly;
  • Dark-skinned patients, whose veins may not be visible;
  • Obese patients, whose veins may not be visible or palpable;
  • Patients having many diagnostic or therapeutic intravenous procedures;
  • Burn victims;
  • Agitated or restless patients;
  • Oncology patients on chemotherapy;
  • Other patients with chronic diseases;
  • Drug abusers.

(via the-end-of-an-anchor)

Phlebotomy Session

Today, in a matter of 30 minutes, I stuck 7 people, and I got blood every. single. time.

My heart was racing, my breathing was heavy, and my hands were doing things I could have never imagined them to do. I’m officially certified to collect blood from research patients at work. Now when I see bulging veins, I get extremely excited.

I vant your blood (in my best vampire voice).

For Real Though

  • My Uncle: I'm going to be really proud of you when you go to PA school and become a PA.
  • Me: I'm going to be proud of me too. :)
populationpensive:

takma-rierah:

theredoormouse:

gowns:

adultinsect:

mrcaptaincook:

kinesin (a motor protein) pulling a some kind of vesicle along some kind of cytoskeletal filament
via John Liebler at Art of the Cell

me coming into the club

life is TRULY INCREDIBLE AND FUCKED UP

wtf is this? Is this in a person? Or an animal? Maybe a freaky ass plant?

Basically within the cell of any eukaryote, as far as I know. How did you THINK things moved around inside your cells - by floating around? Nah man, they walk
(I used to think they just floated too)

I FUCKING LOVE MOTOR PROTEINS! They are my favorite.
*end nerdgasm*

populationpensive:

takma-rierah:

theredoormouse:

gowns:

adultinsect:

mrcaptaincook:

kinesin (a motor protein) pulling a some kind of vesicle along some kind of cytoskeletal filament

via John Liebler at Art of the Cell

me coming into the club

life is TRULY INCREDIBLE AND FUCKED UP

wtf is this? Is this in a person? Or an animal? Maybe a freaky ass plant?

Basically within the cell of any eukaryote, as far as I know. How did you THINK things moved around inside your cells - by floating around? Nah man, they walk

(I used to think they just floated too)

I FUCKING LOVE MOTOR PROTEINS! They are my favorite.

*end nerdgasm*

Q

drvandyke asked:

Hey Doc. I'm curious - What specialty did you train in? Do you only work in Urgent Care?

A

cranquis:

cranquis:

Well you know what they say about curiosity…

My residency was in Family Medicine. Half-way through that, I discovered that what I *really* liked was Emergency Medicine (variety + procedures + fast pace = a 12-hour shift is over before I even know it!), but by that point I didn’t feel like hitting the reset button and starting a new residency all over — and when I discovered that I could still focus on Urgent Care without switching residencies, that became my goal.

There are a few Urgent Care residencies now, I believe, as well as Urgent Care fellowships for Family Medicine residents. I just did my 3 years of FM residency and then hunted for U.C. jobs.

I work only in Urgent Care. Some U.C.’s will also hire “traditional” FM docs (i.e. they also have a “regular” clinic with their own panel of patients) who want to pick up extra hours/$ by working in an Urgent Care. I, on the other hand, don’t like the traditional FM structure much — that whole “pager/on-call/admitting to the hospital" thing, + the whole "dealing with multiple complicated medical issues on a long-term basis" thing + the whole "FM doctors don’t get reimbursed for all the time, effort, paperwork, and phone calls that they have to make" thing.

In my Urgent Care, I am a shift worker. I know my schedule a month in advance. I come in to work, I run like mad for 8 hours, I finish dictating my charts, and then I go home — while my job stays at the building. Nobody pages me, no patients call me, I don’t get up at 2 am (except to change Baby Cranquis’ diapers). Since our U.C. is closed every Sunday, I always get that day off. I’m happy, my wife is happy, and that’s what really matters! On top of that, I get paid salary + productivity, so money is not a worry. I get to do procedures (stitching, splinting, draining abscesses, removing foreign bodies from ears and noses and skin, debriding burns and wounds). I get to see kids and adults. I can always decide that a case is beyond the UC’s capability to handle and send the patient to the ER. I get to use my sense of humor and sleight-of-hand to distract and console little scared kids. I help patients make connections with specialists. I provide “second opinions” and an alternative viewpoint for patients with unusual or mysterious cases that their primary doctors no longer want to address.

In short: despite my Cranquis outlook on this blog, I love my job!

Thanks for the question. Good luck with your schooling.

From the Archives: What I do and Why

(PLUS: How to use Cranquis as an adjective)

image

digiti-minimi:

I took my PANCE today, which was the last remaining cloud hanging over my head. I can officially move on from student life. So strange to think that I am a PA now… Just waiting on that -C, which I will find out about in around two weeks’ time.

The exam actually wasn’t too bad! The anticipation…