Q

chelseytn asked:

What part of the hospital are you a CNA? I am currently in class and deciding where I would like to apply. You're on the right track and your post shows you're working your butt off. Your persistence will pay off!

A

I work with Rehab patients. All of them have compromised mobility. I help with EVERYTHING. You do ADLs, lifting and transporting the whole day. It’s the only unit in the hospital that I interviewed where I didn’t see nurses hanging out at the nurses station. There is no downtime. 

On a daily basis I work along with Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy, Speech Therapy, PAs, MDs, Nurses and Dieticians. We all work as a team to get our patients to recovery.

I interviewed in a General Medicine, and Cardio unit also, but I liked Rehab the best. In other units you may only take Vital Signs and monitor blood glucose on patients. But in the Rehab unit my scope of work is maxed out, everything I learned in class, I do at least once during my shift.

The best part of the Rehab unit is that the patients are enthused about their recovery, they have deadlines, and goals. They want to get mobility back so they can be independent again, and it’s really gratifying to be a part of it. I really do have the best patients.

Don’t you hate it?

I work my regular research job Monday - Thursday. 

I have Fridays off (YES!).

I work my Nursing Assistant job Saturday and Sunday. 

I dread going to work as a Nursing Assistant on the weekends. It’s the pure exhaustion of being at work before the sun comes up. It’s standing on my feet all day. It’s the hurt in my back at the end of the day.

It makes me wonder sometimes if I should even become a PA if being a CNA is so hard on me. But then I realize, getting up at the crack of dawn, standing up all day, and the uncertainty of the workload would not bother me if I really LOVED my job. I don’t love being a CNA, but it allows me to be a healthcare provider, it allows me to see patients that I really have become fond of. The scope of work of a PA is completely different than that of a CNA, and just because I don’t love being a CNA doesn’t mean I won’t be a great PA.

Some thoughts to start my week of with.

Suhoor (Breakfast before Fast)

Last night at 10PM I got all these wild thoughts about what my husband and I should eat during suhoor the next morning @ 3AM (that is not a typo!). I was in full chef mode promising a buffet rivaling the best bistros in town.

Fast forward to 3AM the next morning. Actually fast forward to 4AM. I wake up in a frantic frenzy because I’ve overslept. I’ve got 20 minutes to eat something before the sun comes up (can’t eat after the sun comes up). So, all my chef abilities went into shaking my husband awake, running down stairs, throwing 2 bagels in the toaster while simultaneously trying to chug 2 liters of water from the fridge.

I feel like I failed the man. Where was the buffet I promised? I told him I’d try again tomorrow (heck even I was excited about it!).

*yawn* oh well, here’s to a better rest of the day.

Seriously everyone look at these vine ripe badass tomatoes I got from my garden today. Many more to come! Eek! I have to give a shout-out to my husband for actually watering the plants.

Y’all will not believe some of the big names NOT on this list. The hospital I do my research work at is on the list. :)

Paradise on Earth
The 8 Habits of Highly Productive People
1: Ruthlessly cut away the unimportant (and Focus on the important)
2: Allocate breaks strategically (rest when you are tired)
3: Remove productivity pit stops (things that limit your productivity)
4: Tap into your inspiration (channel your inner muse)
5: Create barriers to entry (don’t’ make yourself too accessible)
6: Optimize time pockets (make the best of every minute)
7: Set timelines (so things get done)
8: Automate everything possible (outsource, delegate, automate)

The 8 Habits of Highly Productive People

1: Ruthlessly cut away the unimportant (and Focus on the important)

2: Allocate breaks strategically (rest when you are tired)

3: Remove productivity pit stops (things that limit your productivity)

4: Tap into your inspiration (channel your inner muse)

5: Create barriers to entry (don’t’ make yourself too accessible)

6: Optimize time pockets (make the best of every minute)

7: Set timelines (so things get done)

8: Automate everything possible (outsource, delegate, automate)

Orientation Over

So I’ve officially finished my orientation as a Nursing Assistant at my new weekend position. It’s funny how quickly you get over seeing your patients at their worst. I’ve been yelled at, frowned upon, passed over for other nursing assistants, and even told jokes, and hugged by my patients. You get over the sight of nekkid bodies, and seeing another human’s genitals, get over the human smells of feces, urine, blood and vomit. Heck, you even get used to the smells of the cafeteria food. It’s an interesting transition I’ve seen in myself. I’m squeamish, don’t get me wrong. One of the first times I successfully catheterized a patient I remember awkwardly fumbling with their man parts, and mortified that I’d somehow stab his bladder with the cath by going in too far. But now, it’s effortless, it’s routine.

The patients no longer scare me. This is a good place to be. Although, I still scare myself, which is good. I feel the day I stop being scared of myself is the day that I might accidentally hurt one of my patients. 

when two worlds collide

I’m at my weekend CNA job at one of the awesome hospitals (Hospital A) in the county I live in. I started telling one of the nurses that I work in clinical research at another hospital (Hospital B) Monday thru Friday. She also works at hospital B during the week!

Get this, not only is she one of the thousands of people that works at hospital B, but she is the new clinical nurse on one of the studies I’m a data manager for. How crazy is that? We go to the same sites for work 7 days a week.